10 questions every writer should ask their story

10 questions every writer should ask their story

You’ve written your story, now how can you test whether or not it’s as good as it can be? In Into the Woods and on his online courses John Yorke recommends asking 10 questions to check you’ve got your story straight: an approach as relevant to business, science, marketing and tech stories as it is to dramatic narratives.

How a John Yorke Story course helped my career

How a John Yorke Story course helped my career

The production of story – be it film, theatre or television – is a team effort, and as such it’s not just the writer who needs to understand how stories are told. Former Storytelling for Screen student Thomas Hescott explains how the lessons he learnt from Into the Woods helped him perfect his art, and secure a directorial role on EastEnders.

Screenwriting Q&A: becoming a professional

Screenwriting Q&A: becoming a professional

Treatments. Agents. ‘The Industry’. These are all daunting prospects for a budding screenwriter, but things that need to be tackled in order to find success. In the second part of our Q&A, award-winning scriptwriter, editor, and Professional Writing Academy tutor David Roden chats with our Storytelling for Screen students about getting their treatments just right, how to introduce themselves to agents, and the benefits of knowing a friend of a friend of a friend.

What factual TV can learn from drama

In his bestselling book on screenwriting Into The Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them, John Yorke argues that all compelling stories share an underlying structure, no matter their format or genre. So what do the great storytellers of film and TV drama have to teach those who work in factual entertainment, current affairs, history/science/the arts, and documentaries – anything, in fact, that’s non-fiction? A new course explores what you can take from dramatic structure to create factual stories that resonate deeply with an audience.